Skip to content

5 Reasons Not To Cup

I have to take four Tums before I discuss current events, and lately reading the newspaper gives me alopecia.  However, we need to talk about an article I read in the Washington Post.

The article was about cupping.

Until now, I thought cupping was an awkward thing people did after first base but before any shirts came offIn other words, something my French Exchange Student did at prom.

I was wrong.

According to the article, cupping is a method of alternative healing.  Glass domes are heated with flaming alcohol and placed on your back, creating a vacuum that lifts your skin up into the cup and opens your pores.  It’s supposed to realign your energy and release toxins and “blockages.”

Apparently Gwyneth Paltrow does it.

Y’all, that does not mean we should cup (do cupping?).  Do you remember what she named her children?

Moses and Apple.

In the past 10 seconds, I have come up with 5 reasons not to cup:

  1. There’s no clinical evidence to support it even though it has been going on since at least 1550 B.C.;
  2. It’s been going on since 1550 B.C., meaning it was invented by people who had no idea what they were doing because they lived *before* the Dark Ages (1100-750 B.C.);
  3. Other options for realigning your energy include: sleeping on the other side of the bed, getting a hair cut, and having a beer;
  4. If the person doing the cupping accidentally spills the alcohol they’re heating up with an open flame, you get flambéed like a crêpe suzette;
  5. It leaves hickeys on your back.  Back hickeys.  Hickeys bigger than any hickey anyone has ever gotten at any prom, anywhere.  Including proms in France.

What the hell.

I mean, I’m Italian, so I’m genetically required to take the bajillion visible pores on my body seriously.  But I would never cup.  I would rather buy $90 worth of Bioré pore strips and use barbecue tongs and a mirror to paste them all over my back.  And then Scott would come home and be all those tongs are for hamburgers.  And I’d be all you don’t understand because your people were, like, Bavarian, and then I’d need help getting into a warm shower because that many pore strips will turn into a plaster cast if you’re not careful.

But if you decide to cup, I won’t judge.  Please just tell us all about it.  The rest of us will eliminate our toxins by sweating, followed by a healthy snack.

I’m thinking homemade hummus. With a good base recipe, the possibilities are endless.  Here, I’ve made scallion hummus, olive hummus, red pepper hummus, and roasted garlic hummus. The recipes below include what I consider the bare minimum of tahini and olive oil.  Without more, these hummuses are on the dry and chunky side.  I leave it to you to add more olive oil or water as you see fit to get a hummus as creamy as you like. You can also throw in paprika, cumin or cayenne and serve it drizzled with olive oil.

I use canned chickpeas now because the past two times I made hummus with dried chickpeas, I forgot they were soaking and then they sprouted.  It was weird.

There are lots of great hummus recipes out there.  Check out this one for white bean hummus from Orangette and this one from Smitten Kitchen.  Heck, throw your own down in the comments.

[Update: one reader threw down a helpful, funny guide to making your hummus creamy.  She recommends peeling the chickpeas and creaming the tahini, oil, lemon and salt together first.]

{Download & Print Recipes}

Basic Hummus

Ingredients:

1 can garbanzo beans (chickpeas)

2 tbsp. lemon juice (1 good lemon should be enough)

3 tsp.  olive oil (plus more, if desired, to taste)

1 tsp.  tahini

1/8 tsp. salt

Directions:

Drain and rinse chickpeas. Puree ingredients in a food processor, adding water or oil until desired consistency is reached.

[Note: I use a very minimal amount of olive oil because that's just the way I like it, so mine is on the chunky side.  If you like creamy hummus, like Sabra brand, just keep adding olive oil (or water,  if you want a lower fat content).  Adjust the salt to taste.  Tahini has a peanuty-flavor, and this recipe goes light on that also. More can be added for a richer hummus.]

Roasted Garlic Hummus

Ingredients:

1 can garbanzo beans (chickpeas)

1 head garlic

2 tbsp. lemon juice (1 good lemon should be enough)

4 tsp.  olive oil (plus more, if desired, to taste)

1 tsp.  tahini

1/8 tsp. salt

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Remove the outer layer of skin from the head of garlic.  (There is skin around every individual clove as well as skin that grows over the whole head of garlic. Just remove the outer layer so each clove is only surrounded by its own skin.

Cut 1/4-1/2 inch off the top of the head of garlic, so that the top of each clove is chopped off.  (If you can’t chop all the cloves, including the far outside ones, in one chop, just slice the tops of the outside ones off separately.)

Spoon 1 tsp. of the olive oil over the head of garlic so that it sinks down into the cloves.

Place in a muffin tin or on a baking sheet, and cover the head of garlic with tin foil. Roast for about 45 minutes or until the garlic is soft and light golden.  Check periodically to make sure the garlic does not turn brown.

When garlic is cool enough to handle, peel away the skin and use a butter knife or your fingers to slide the cloves out.

Drain and rinse chickpeas. Puree the chickpeas with the 2 tsp. remaining olive oil, the garlic, and the other ingredients in a food processor.  Add more water or oil until desired consistency is reached.

Roasted Red Pepper Hummus

Ingredients:

1 can garbanzo beans (chickpeas)

2/3 c. roasted red peppers, drained

2 tbsp. lemon juice (1 good lemon should be enough)

3 tsp.  olive oil (plus more, if desired, to taste)

1 tsp.  tahini

1/8 tsp. salt

Directions:

Drain and rinse chickpeas. Puree ingredients in a food processor, adding water or oil until desired consistency is reached.

[Note: I use a very minimal amount of olive oil because that's just the way I like it, so mine is on the chunky side.  If you like creamy hummus, like Sabra brand, just keep adding olive oil (or water,  if you want a lower fat content).  Adjust the salt to taste.  Tahini has a peanuty-flavor, and this recipe goes light on that also. More can be added for a richer hummus.]

Olive Hummus

Ingredients:

1 can garbanzo beans (chickpeas)

About 12-15 kalamata or french gigante olives (pitted)

2 tbsp. lemon juice (1 good lemon should be enough)

3 tsp.  olive oil (plus more, if desired, to taste)

1 tsp.  tahini

Directions:

Drain and rinse chickpeas. Puree ingredients in a food processor, adding water or oil until desired consistency is reached.

This recipe does not call for salt because the olives are salty, but you can adjust as you see fit.

[Note: I use a very minimal amount of olive oil because that's just the way I like it, so mine is on the chunky side.  If you like creamy hummus, like Sabra brand, just keep adding olive oil (or water,  if you want a lower fat content).  Tahini has a peanuty-flavor, and this recipe goes light on that also. More can be added for a richer hummus.]

Scallion Hummus

Ingredients:

1 can garbanzo beans (chickpeas)

5 scallions (green onions)

2 tbsp. lemon juice (1 good lemon should be enough)

3 tsp.  olive oil (plus more, if desired, to taste)

1 tsp.  tahini

1/8 tsp. salt

Directions:

Drain and rinse chickpeas. Rinse the scallions, remove the very tops and the roots from the bulb, and chop roughly.

Puree ingredients in a food processor, adding water or oil until desired consistency is reached.

[Note: I use a very minimal amount of olive oil because that's just the way I like it, so mine is on the chunky side.  If you like creamy hummus, like Sabra brand, just keep adding olive oil (or water,  if you want a lower fat content).  Tahini has a peanuty-flavor, and this recipe goes light on that also. More can be added for a richer hummus.] Thunder could never do alternative healing. She’s way too wiggly. P.S. Now I’m worried that little Moses and Apple are going to grow up thinking that it’s okay to give someone an enormous hickey in exchange for cash.  And at some point that could get really weird.  And then we’ll all have to read about that, too.  That’s why I don’t read the paper.

Follow Me on Pinterest

58 Comments Post a comment
  1. I will be forever amazed at the numbers of people who rush right out to try some crazy crap just because some actor/singer/athlete did it. Lemmings. That’s what we’ve become.

    I want all the hummus. At once. Is that wrong? Does that make me a lemming, too?

    [sigh]

    January 27, 2012
    • Good news!!! I don’t think it makes you a lemming because I don’t think they have chickpeas in Antarctica. Or Alaska. Or wherever lemmings are hanging out these days. You’re golden.

      January 27, 2012
  2. Sue #

    I have a similar story that involves a “friend” and a party of ear candlers. It was a long time ago and she will in live in shame forever for falling for the whole candling scam.

    January 27, 2012
    • Sue, I was just thinking of ear candling because I was reading an article about how people are studying the ear wax of whales. I mean, how do they get it out of there? DO THEY CANDLE? These are the things I think about when I can’t sleep.

      January 27, 2012
    • Jenifer #

      Sue- I am currently living in shame for the same reason. LOL Only bad part is, in between trying not to wet themselves my kids were snapping pictures! Now I can’t deny it because THERE’S PROOF!!
      On a side note however, ear candling felt sooo good! Probably better than cupping, however I don’t care to have “back hickey” so I’ll never know! HA!!

      January 27, 2012
  3. For all the fellow smooth hummus lovers out there, peeling the skins off your chick peas makes it creamier and smoother than any amount of oil you can add!

    Observe: http://mamasweeds.com/2011/08/04/how-to-make-awesome-hummus/

    I’m fairly sure this is how they made hummus in 1550 B.C. too.

    January 27, 2012
    • Here I am, just postin’ about hummus, when clearly you’re a hummus guru. I loved your post and I’m so glad you left this comment. I went ahead and referenced it above so the creamy peeps will know what’s up. Also, I loved your writing style and am excited to read more.

      January 27, 2012
  4. For a laugh (and possible bout of heartburn), you should check out Gwynnie’s lifestyle blog, Goop. It never fails to crack me up.

    January 27, 2012
    • Awesome, totally reading it now. Thanks for the heads up. So far, she has not written about her cupping experience. AHA! Told you.

      January 27, 2012
    • Sweet heavens to murgatroyd, Gwyneth Paltrow is NOT INVITED TO MY HOUSE FOR DINNER. Ever.

      (Of course, with all that “cleansing,” it seems as if the woman never eats.)

      January 27, 2012
      • I respect your decision. BUT I have to say that I’d probably let her in to my place. . . if only because she probably knows Javier Bardem, which means she could be an asset to me. I like to think big.

        January 27, 2012
  5. Cheri #

    Ok, I have to say I’ve done the cupping once at my acupuncturist. I’m not all new-agey or anything but I do find value in some types of Eastern medicine…..cant hurt, right? (This was about 5 years ago, so I think this makes me a trendsetter for Gwyneth! or just crazy) Anyway i had it done when I had a chest cold that I could not get rid of. My back hickeys (ew!) were not too bad and the chest cold did go away. I did get talked into something called “scraping” or something similar once at a massage therapist’s office. That was weird. They basically take a jar lid (!!) and scrape it around your neck and back and it is supposed to bring up the bad blood. Again, in the interest, of why not, cant hurt? I tried it. mistake. I dont know if it helped any, and it did bring up blood in my “trouble spots” on my back and neck but I looked like i had been in a car accident or the longest prom night ever. I was COVERED in hickey like spots. It was embarrasing and thankfully winter-time so I could wear turtlenecks for a week.

    January 27, 2012
    • Cheri, you are my hero for commenting about your cupping experience. This is so exciting.

      Your experience sounds not so bad. I will be back in touch if these medicines don’t cure my chest sprain (though have I mentioned how AWESOME they’ve been so far?)

      But you scraping experience sounds horrid. I am of the opinion that blood is blood– it’s all MIXED TOGETHER so there’s no bad blood to get rid of. That’s what I tell the doctor at the clinic when they suggest blood-letting and/or leeches. I am so glad for you that it was wintertime and you had turtlenecks!

      I think I scraped once by accident. I went to a Turkish bath in France once and the people there spoke Turkish, which I did not. There were lots of rooms that you move through in order, and at one point, they handed me a cup of goo with pieces of rock in it. I rubbed it all over myself. I got to the next room and the women gestured like “Oh CRAP, what did you DO?” Turns out I was supposed to get wet first, because it was a heavy abrasive. I started bleeding all over– tiny little cuts on my arms and chest and neck and everything.

      And that is why I don’t exfoliate anymore.

      January 27, 2012
  6. I will not cup. Because in the Beaucoup family we know that the true cure for anything is NOT TALKING ABOUT IT. So, for example, when someone says, too bad your great uncle died of Alzheimer’s disease after only having it for, like, two days, no one bats an eye. Sure, he might have had it for, like, 10 years, but who knows? You don’t talk about it.

    Our second strategy is the No-You-Don’t response. For example:

    movita: I have skin cancer.
    movita’s mother: No, you don’t.
    movita: I don’t?
    movita’s mother: No. Now stop talking about it.

    Cured! With no cups. (And maybe some minor surgery.)

    January 27, 2012
    • Just another reason your mom rocks. Sometimes Scott forgets the No-You-Don’t response. For example, before I had gone to the #$%?! clinic about my chest, I was like “I have this rare disease that the character in this Russian novel I’m reading has.” And he forgot to say “No you don’t,” and I FUH-REAKED out. I was all “well I guess I should start learning Russian so I can communicate with the specialists who I’ll be medivac-ed to next week, and AGAIN he was like “Mmmm hmmm” and I was so crazed that I almost cupped him.

      January 27, 2012
      • Jenifer #

        HA!! “almost cupped him” !!! Almost spit my soup at the screen- that statement so needed a disclaimer!! HA!

        January 27, 2012
        • I hadn’t thought of that, but now that you mention it– Maybe I should let Scott know what I posted on the internets. Whoops!

          January 27, 2012
      • Cripes. Pick me up a cheap iPhone in Russia, will ya?

        January 27, 2012
        • Will do. And if for some reason that doesn’t work out, I’ll just get you a Russian exchange student and you two can work the rights to her phone out amongst yourselves.

          January 27, 2012
  7. jz #

    uh have you seen the new karate kid with jackie chan and will smith’s kid?

    January 27, 2012
    • Holy crap, there is a cupping scene!

      Great. Anything that has ever been in a Karate Kid movie has been tried by kids at home.

      Speaking of Will Smith, did you know that Nas co-wrote Gettin’ Giggy With It? Just heard that. How embarrassing.

      January 27, 2012
  8. Amanda #

    Cupping reminds me of the old days when they used to bleed people to try to heal them. Right…Wow and that scraping thing? Where do people come up with this logic?

    January 27, 2012
    • My feelings precisely, Amanda. And you’re right that it’s part and parcel with blood-letting. Apparently (ahem, from my limited research) cupping and blood letting are based on the same “four humors” theory we rejected in the 1800s (that we’ve composed of yellow bile, black bile, and other things that make me sick to my stomach).

      January 27, 2012
  9. Ann #

    Great hummus recipes-like the variety. The roasted garlic looks esp good. As for the cupping…well, it was big during the years of the Black Death, so maybe Gwyneth is on to something.

    January 27, 2012
    • Ann, the roasted garlic one was my favorite. Now that you mention it, Gwyneth may know a thing or two about infectious diseases, having just starred in Contagion. That’s disconcerting.

      January 27, 2012
  10. Just now reading this, I was busy getting reiki for my dog and drinking a homeopathic remedy made from latex condoms…

    January 27, 2012
    • That sounds about right. At least one person around here knows what she’s doing.

      I got Thunder when she was a few months’ old. So I don’t know what her formal training was in her formative months. Perhaps she was schooled in reiki. That would explain why she puts her paws all over me and seems shocked when I’m like “dude, this isn’t helpful.”

      January 27, 2012
  11. Anthony Bourdain was recently cupped in China for one of his shows (The Layover, I think). That man likely has so much poison in him that cupping could never have done anything good. But, it was super interesting to watch it. Alas, they never showed his back hickeys.

    Also, but somewhat off topic, Suri’s Burn Book (http://surisburnbook.tumblr.com/) is amazing, and sometimes takes pot-shots at Gwyneth and her kids. Absolutely hilar (if you realize that you’re laughing at the parents, and the kids are not to blame in anything that happens).

    January 27, 2012
    • AHA! They didn’t show his back, did they now? I suspect a raging case of the back hickeys. The link you sent is awesome. I love how the tagline is “A study in Suri and the people who disappoint her.” That is hilarious. Also the note in the most recent post that “Justin Bieber, though, looks extremely unsure of this booking.” Thanks for sharing– I’m going to be all over it from now on.

      January 27, 2012
  12. Jura #

    OMG, I totally know what cupping is! It used to be incredibly popular in Eastern Europe, and I believe we had a set of glass cups in our household. I totally imagine the process of cupping, it is right there in my memory… BUT…. I cannot remember whether I was cupped! I must have…Now that I think about it with my rational mind, I definitely say it is weird concept and that there were some sketchy healing methods used by my parents generation.
    I am definitely asking my mom about this during our next phone conversation… I am just curious myself, because you reminded me of something that was buried deep in my memory!

    January 27, 2012
    • Jura, so good to hear from you. That is fascinating. I read on wikipedia that it was super popular in Eastern Europe, as you say, after falling out of use in the 19th century in Western Europe. You have to find out! If you DID cup when you were little, that would suggest that it had no long-term adverse side effects, since you are clearly awesome. If you DID NOT cup when you were little, well, then we’re back where we started. Which is- I repeat- not a bad place to be.

      I am sure I required all sorts of physical and psychological interventions of all varieties when I was a child, because from what I remember, I was a Class A maniac. But like you, I have repressed it all (hopefully.)

      January 27, 2012
    • Jura #

      OK, I just had an enlightening conversation with my mom. Fact 1. We have cupping cups at home. 20 of them. Fact 2. I have never been cupped (phew), but I have been subjected to some other weird stuff. Read below. Fact 3. She used them to treat cough and lung infections (bronchitis?). Fact 4. My mom (thank God) is now aware of medical knowledge that it doesn’t do anything good. Better later then never. Fact 5. The process that she described involved lighting 200 proof alcohol spirit. Fact 6. She uses one of the cups to massage cellulite out of her massage subjects, but just as a tool, without any fire (she does massage as a hobby). Boy I learned so many things! One of which… another trigger of one of the memories buried deep….Have you heard of “a respiratory poultice of mustard seed”? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mustard_plaster
      well, as a child, I have certainly been subjected to this treatment method for cough and bronchitis (commercially available in soviet pharmacies, not homemade), and I remember it being quite painful (when you need to peel it off the chest). It appears that at least there is SOME scientific basis for it, so I still have some faith in my mom’s curing choices. This was one fun conversation, and all thanks to this blog post!

      January 29, 2012
      • Jura, this is amazing. Your mom sounds cool–and some day maybe those 20 cupping cups will be worth something.

        I have totally heard of mustard poultices! I think they do it in the book “Little Women” when someone is sick. I loved that book when I was growing up. And I always thought mustard plaster sounded kind of soothing– I had no idea it was painful (I should have known, since it’s plaster, for crying out loud. Ouch.)

        Thank goodness for Advil Cold & Sinus, right?

        January 29, 2012
  13. Thunder sure is cute; cupping is really weird (and I believe in alternative medicine), and the hummus rocks. Great post.

    January 27, 2012
    • Thanks much! I wish I read your blog in high school, because it wasn’t until a couple of years ago that I found out I had dry skin. I had always thought it was the opposite. Where were you when I needed you? ARG. :)

      January 27, 2012
      • Not that your blog is for high schoolers. Arg. Having trouble putting words together because we just made chocolate chip cookies and I’m on a sugar high. Carry on.

        January 27, 2012
  14. Camille #

    And speaking of blood letting; Last summer I bought an absolutely daaarling antique oval bowl that has an interesting u-shape removed from the rim on one side. So there is was – so proudly displayed on my dining room sideboard (and thereby proving I am such a tasteful little minx) and a guest said to me, “Oh, you have a blood letting collection bowl on your dining room sideboard, how….interesting”. *gag* Well, let me tell you – it lent an entirely different tone to the rest of the dinner party. Had I been told the bare facts much sooner, I might have used it to serve up the pudding because as you may not know, I’m real classy that way. Now I use it to hold my car keys when I come through the door. *clank*

    January 27, 2012
    • Camille, that is an amazing story. I bet your entire sideboard (and maybe your keys/car) is haunted by GHOSTS now. I mean, can you just imagine the stories of the people that bowl has known? That’s nuts! I am so jealous.

      January 27, 2012
  15. MJ #

    Hmm, must peel my chickpeas next time. My hummus is never quite smooth enough.

    (I also like roasting garlic in the toaster oven – you have to check on it every now and again to make sure it’s not burning, but it doesn’t make your kitchen a furnace like the conventional oven does. Fun fact if you live through a Southern summer… Plus, less energy wasted! Everyone wins!)

    January 28, 2012
    • MJ-

      First of all, Scott loves Battlestar and got me hooked. I don’t know what season I’m on because I took a two-year hiatus, so I need to go back and figure that out. [Note that Scott just leaned over to tell me all these things to write to you, but I told him you were only on Season 3 and we couldn't spoil it and he thew his hands up and went "AAAAAAGH!!"]

      Second, I am totally checking my car for pine needle nests before mine catches on fire like yours. Yikes.

      January 29, 2012
      • MJ #

        Haha, yes. I actually already had the major reveal spoiled for me, and I’m getting a little antsy because R has no idea and he keeps guessing at things that I know are wrong. I have to bite my tongue, and it is TOUGH. The “don’t spoil it” was partially for me in case there’s another huge thing I don’t know, and partially because he reads and I don’t want anything ruined for him. (I inadvertently spoiled one of the deaths in Harry Potter for him years ago, and if I spoil BSG he might very well file for divorce.)

        As for the car, I have to fight the urge to pop the hood if I’ve left it sitting for a day or two. One car fire was enough for me.

        January 30, 2012
    • Also, I like the idea of the toaster oven. Seems silly to heat up the huge oven for something so tiny as a bulb or two of garlic.

      January 29, 2012
  16. some people are so weird. Cupping sounds painful, although that’s how my Mother In Law used to draw boils when her kids got them. Heat a glass milk bottle and put it over the boil and it would suck it out. It’s easier to just soak a cotton pad in caster oil and break the top of the infection and put the casteroil pad over it. Caster oil will suck the gunk out much quicker.

    Now I’ve totally turned your stomach I’ll just say the roasted garlic Hummous is delicious.

    January 28, 2012
    • Hello there! Your smoked salmon quiche looks really delicious. We’re big fans of that sort of thin in this household. I could have breakfast for dinner most nights. And I’m glad your husband survived all that cupping and caster oiling. He’s a lucky man, especially since he lived to eat those delicious things on your site.

      January 29, 2012
  17. Ha ha! You had me at alopecia! Maybe Gwen’s next kid could be named Crepe Suzette.

    January 30, 2012
  18. I have to confess I have been cupped once without being asked – I should start a support group since it sounds a little like I have been molested in some way LOL
    Several years ago I was suffering from chronic migraines and although seeking help from modern medicine (a neurologist) blinded by pain I was willing to try just about anything and so tried acupuncture (several thousand years of chinese medicine can’t be wrong, right?) – I did draw the line at leeches – I do have some standards.
    While doing a convincing impersonation of a human pin cushion – she dropped a half dozen glass cups on my back – not that I knew what was going on – in my condition I wouldn’t have noticed a truck crashing through the wall…..
    It was not unpleasant and I had no back hickeys so maybe she wasn’t doing it right LOL
    In other news there is a nice local restaurant that does a lovely trio of hummus – Garlic, Olive and Sun-dried Tomato – which is quite delicious but can’t topple my one true love Garlic

    January 31, 2012
  19. Shelly, you’re not alone! Turns out others who visit eggton have been cupped too! Plus, now that we know that there is a cupping scene in the new Karate Kid movie, we are allowed to think it’s less weird, and could possibly give you superpowers. (Like you, the kid in that movie does not appear to have arm hickeys after he’s cupped on his arm. Maybe Gwyneth Paltrow just has a bad cupper.) I hope your migraines have gone away or that you’ve found something that helps manage them!

    You might want to roast two heads of garlic if you make this recipe, then–if you are a tried-and-true garlic lover. There is a Greek restaurant near me that we haven’t been to yet, but they have hummus on the menu, too. I’m dying to go. I could just eat platters of Greek appetizers and dips all night long.

    January 31, 2012
    • super powers would be awesome – perhaps the ability to generate large bowls of garlic hummus with my laser hummus vision…. I can think of hundred of uses for that >8)

      January 31, 2012
  20. Hi…
    Just enjoying your site and your humor.

    If I do any cupping – I’d prefer that it involves coffee.
    If it has to do with my blood, I guess it’s better than leaches. Besides, I secretly love hickeys.

    February 3, 2012
    • Wendy, I’m thinking you like hickeys (and I do not) because you were dating hot motorcycle boys in your teenage years, and I was not. Dunno–just thinking that the two things might be related and that you’re on the winning side of history on this one.

      February 6, 2012
  21. Kate #

    This just in from the latest edition of Cook’s Illustrated. Heating the chickpeas in the microwave for a minute before you puree makes for a much silkier hummus! And remains that way even after being refrigerated. Page 30 of the Jan/Feb edition, they got the tip from Melissa Clark’s blog.

    February 4, 2012
    • Awesome! That’s a really easy fix, then. I’ll have to pick that up. Thanks!

      February 6, 2012
  22. I’ve cupped, I’ve cupped! Or I’ve been cupped! … Or I’m a cupper, or something.

    I actually did this for the first time a couple days before this post, so when I saw it, I felt the stars had aligned or something like that. I’ve been going to an acupuncturist here in Austin for the past 5 weeks for back pains (since a chiropractor is way too expensive and because everyone told me to never go to one…). Luckily, the acupuncture place is low cost so I only spend $15 a visit. Anyways, the needles weren’t working (and actually started getting more painful/uncomfortable each visit), so he asked if I wanted to try cupping. Which I agreed to.

    Now my experience didn’t involve flames or alcohol, unless it was very discreet to the point of not existing at all. The suction part was definitely involved though, which was an odd, yet not painful, sensation. Afterwards, I looked like I got jumped by a gang who had a fetish for perfectly symmetrical and circular abuse. Those marks didn’t go away for a week.

    The good news though is that it worked. Well, for a week. The pain is slowly coming back now, but I was pretty surprised that it made me feel better for a whole week. Not sure if I’ll do it again, but who knows.

    And actually, as I think about it, since the whole point of it is to bring the blood and energy and whatnot to the surface and out of the prior place of “embeddedness”, I wonder if getting hit in the back, to the point of immense bruising, would actually give the same results. The blood would be pushed to the surface right, hence the bruising from getting hit? Dunno, just a theory.

    February 6, 2012
    • How did I not respond to this amazing cupping report until just now?! My apologies. Especially because this comment is awesome. It sounds like you’ve concluded that we can either cup OR join a fight club. Same results either way. I wonder if the fight club membership fee is more than the $15 the acupuncturist charges. Or maybe you get PAID to be in the fight club. Basically, we need more information.

      I’m glad your symptoms went away. One of the implications of your comment is that we DEFINITELY should not cup in the summertime, when our back hickies are more likely to be visible to others. I wonder if you’d get an uneven tan if you sunbathed after cupping. Like I said, we need more information.

      February 21, 2012
  23. karabird #

    I’m OBSESSED with those Biore strips…Also, what Thunder is doing in those pics is my alternative healing modality (getting up close to dirt, leaves, fresh air…etc etc)

    And while I have a high tolerance for The Weird in life, I approve of item #3 on your list!
    xoxo

    February 1, 2013

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. Lifestream for February 1st | Kyle MacLean LL.B(log)
  2. Free Cheeseballs And Vodka In One Easy Step | eggton
  3. The World Is A Rainbow Of Crazy, My Diva Muffins! | eggton

{Leave a Note}

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s